African displacement

roots, resources and resolution
FMR 16
January 2003

The eleven articles in the feature section look at displacement in Africa in general and specifically relating to Burundi, Uganda, Sudan, Kenya, Western Sahara, Egypt, Zimbabwe and Angola. Three general articles look at Yemen, the ‘CNN effect’ on humanitarian crises, and Palestinian refugee property issues.

Contents

Arafat Jamal

Increasing numbers of African refugees are stuck in protracted refugee situations.

Dianna J Shandy

This article explores how the ties between resettled Sudanese refugees and those who remain in Africa shape the lives of people in both settings.

Greta Zeender

While the international community is disseminating the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in Burundi, local actors are also taking matters into their own hands to tell people about their rights at a grassroots level.

Raquel Wexler

"Special attention should also be given to the prevention of contagious and infectious diseases, including AIDS, among internally displaced persons." (Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, 19.3)

Emmanuel Bagenda and Lucy Hovil

Sudanese refugees in northern Uganda not only have to contend with the numerous problems associated with living in a settlement but also have to live with the daily threat of armed attack.

Refugee Consortium of Kenya

Kenya hosts approximately 250,000 refugees from over 11 war-torn countries.

Hernan del Valle and Tara Polzer

The presidential elections in Zimbabwe in May 2002 took place within a context of political violence, economic crisis and increasing food shortages. As conditions deteriorated and the possibility of a mass population exodus from Zimbabwe increased, neighbouring countries started preparations to deal with the possibility of a mass influx of refugees across their borders.

Kamia Carvalho

The most overused word to describe Angola is 'potential'.

Monette Zard in collaboration with Chaloka Beyani and Chidi Anselm Odinkalu

On paper, African refugees benefit from one of the world's most progressive protection regimes. In reality, however, they face endless human rights hurdles involving forced return, discrimination, arbitrary arrest and detention, restricted freedom of movement and expression and violations of social and economic rights.

General articles

Nesya H B Hughes

Despite accession to the refugee Convention, the sources of codified law governing the practice of asylum in Yemen have remained limited…. Similarly, administrative capacity and policy formulation related to asylum seekers and refugees are still evolving.
'Yemen 2000 Annual Protection Report - Executive Summary', UNHCR Sana'a, Yemen

Gorm Rye Olsen, Nils Carstensen and Kristian Høyen

"Lucky are the people of Yugoslavia and Somalia as the world's eyes rest on them. Condemned are the people of Juba … It may be a blessing to die in front of a camera - then at least the world will get to know about it. But it is painful to die or be killed, without anybody knowing it."
Hand-written letter smuggled out from the besieged Southern Sudanese town of Juba, August 1992.

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