Culture in exile

FMR 6
December 1999

This issue includes a feature section on culture in exile. Freedom to express one’s cultural identity can be a powerful way to maintain a community’s mental and even physical health. Freedom of expression is also a right and, as our language of assistance moves from needs-based to rights-based, respect for the empowering forms of cultural expression should inform our thinking and planning. It also includes a section on the most pressing issues (relating to forced migration) of the new millennium as perceived and written about by eight  individuals from different fields.

Contents

Sandra Dudley

The effects of displacement on culture can have significant impacts on the psychological and physical welfare of individual refugees and on the social dynamics within a refugee population.

John Baily

Refugee communities are often deprived of their customary means of musical expression, either because they have become separated from their musicians or from their traditional musical instruments, or due to a lack of opportunity in the host country.

Clare Harris

Since 1959 when the 14th Dalai Lama escaped from Tibet, more than 130,000 Tibetans have followed him into exile.

Bo Viktor Nylund, Jean Claude Legrand and Peter Holtsberg

The psychosocial care and protection of children affected by armed conflict and displacement are extremely important components of humanitarian action.

Nazim Akhundov

In any group of IDP children, there will be children who require psychotherapeutic interventions and children who need only social and educational rehabilitation.

Helen Scott-Danter

A group of actors stands in a frozen image of a community whose members do not communicate. A man comes from the audience and moves the actors around to create an image of everyone standing in reconciliation. Then a man and a woman create an image of ‘transition’, where the actors show a willingness to communicate by sitting in a circle drinking the local brew. The actors then show the three images in succession and the audience applauds.

General articles

Roberta Cohen

In some countries, the internally displaced are beyond the reach of international humanitarian organizations.

Disclaimer
Opinions in FMR do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors, the Refugee Studies Centre or the University of Oxford.
Copyright
FMR is an Open Access publication. Users are free to read, download, copy, distribute, print or link to the full texts of articles published in FMR and on the FMR website, as long as the use is for non-commercial purposes and the author and FMR are attributed. All articles published in FMR in print and online, and FMR itself, are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. Details at www.fmreview.org/copyright.