Dilemmas of development induced displacement

FMR 12
January 2002

One of the social costs of development is that dams, roads, ports, railways, mines and logging  displace people. In all cases displacement raises important ethical questions. What is owed to people who are displaced? Under what conditions can development that includes displacement be justified? What kind of ethical analysis can provide justification for displacement-inducing development? The six articles in the feature section attempt to address these questions; also included is a literature review relating to development-induced displacement and resettlement. This issue also includes six general articles focusing on subjects such as Brazil’s Refugee Act, separated children seeking asylum, Angolan IDPs, and trafficking and smuggling.

Contents

Peter Penz

One of the social costs of development is that dams, roads, ports, railways, mines and logging displace people. In all cases displacement raises important ethical questions. What is owed to people who are displaced? Under what conditions can development that includes displacement be justified? What kind of ethical analysis can provide justification for displacement-inducing development? (1)

compiled by Chris de Wet

The annual displacement by development projects of some ten million people has immense socio-economic and human rights consequences.

Shawn Steil and Duan Yuefang

The Three Gorges Project on China’s Yangtze River is the largest and perhaps most controversial development-induced displacement project in the world. Official estimates place the resettlement population at over 1.2 million by 2009.

Bjorn Pettersson

If the exact number of conflict-induced IDPs is unclear (most observers agree there are 20-25 million) the number of those displaced by development projects is even harder to estimate.

General articles

Ghassem Fardanesh and Bryan Walker

In Sri Lanka, the ethnic conflict has continued for nearly 20 years with about 60,000 killed and nearly one million displaced within the island.

Anne Gallagher

Through the adoption of two new treaties on trafficking and migrant smuggling, Statesstates are attempting to curb the growing influence of organizedorganised criminal groups on international migration. The risk of human rights being marginalizedmarginalised in this process is, unfortunately, a very real one.

Steve Utterwulghe

On the rare occasions that Angola makes the international headlines it is usually to inform the world what a terrible place it is.

Ravi Kohli

In the UK there are currently some 5,000 unaccompanied asylum-seeking young people who are being looked after or supported by local authorities.

Kate Halvorsen

In recent years an estimated 20,000 separated children (primarily from Africa and Asia) have sought asylum in western and central Europe.

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