Return to peace

post-conflict realities
FMR 11
October 2001

The ten articles in the feature theme address a range of aspects of the ‘return to peace’, including the relationship between several concepts of truth, justice and reconciliation; women’s role in peace and in particular in Rwanda and the Balkans; and return and reconciliation in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Cambodia. The general articles in this issue look at resettlement, refugee protection in Dadaab, early warning in the Horn of Africa, and the semantics of asylum.

Contents

Marcia Byrom Hartwell

One of the greatest challenges facing a country after civil war is to find a way to peacefully coexist and rebuild with former enemies.

Julie de Rivero

During the Guatemalan civil war, an estimated 150,000 people fled Guatemala to seek refuge in neighbouring countries (mainly Mexico) and one million became internally displaced.

Maha Muna and Rachel Watson

Perpetué Kankindi longs for an end to the seven-year civil war that has devastated her native Burundi.

Diana Quick

In 1994 genocide shattered the foundations of Rwanda, unleashing violence, hatred and the murder of more than half a million people.

Rachel Wareham and Diana Quick

Why have post-war reconstruction initiatives treated women as passive recipients of aid rather than as active partners?

Walpurga Englbrecht

The signing of the General Framework Agreement for Peace for Bosnia and Herzegovina (GFAP) on 14 December 1995 marked the end of a three-and-a-half-year conflict which caused 1.2m refugees to flee abroad and displaced a further 1.1m within Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Guy Hovey

How sustainable are minority returns? What do the displaced themselves think of the return process and the programmes designed to facilitate return?

Jon Bennett

Following 30 years of war and mass displacement, Cambodia is entering an era of relative stability. Political tensions have eased, refugees and internally displaced people have resettled and steady economic growth is forecast.

Thomas Feeny

This year, Bangladesh celebrates its 30th birthday as an independent nation state. Compared to other countries in South Asia it is still a relative newcomer, and yet the journey so far has been difficult.

Pamela Baxter

Although refugees are often the victims of ethnic, religious or political intolerance, they carry their own prejudices with them into exile.

General articles

Alice Edwards

‘Resettlement’ refers to the relocation to other countries of refugees who have sought refuge in a country where they continue to face risks to their “life, liberty, safety, health or other fundamental human rights”(1).

Jelvas Musau

When I joined UNHCR I had lofty but imprecise ideas as to what my job would entail.

Sharon Rusu

Is it possible to warn about violent conflicts, prevent them before they escalate and reconcile the warring parties?

Stephen Moss

Our confusion over the language of asylum reflects our confusion over the issue itself.

Disclaimer
Opinions in FMR do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors, the Refugee Studies Centre or the University of Oxford.
Copyright
FMR is an Open Access publication. Users are free to read, download, copy, distribute, print or link to the full texts of articles published in FMR and on the FMR website, as long as the use is for non-commercial purposes and the author and FMR are attributed. All articles published in FMR in print and online, and FMR itself, are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. Details at www.fmreview.org/copyright.